Can I Sue My Boss For Asking Me Out on a Date?

Sue your boss for harassment? If your boss asks you out on a date, you say “no,” and that’s the end of it, probably not.  There is no law prohibiting your boss from simply asking you out on a date.  On the other hand, if your boss asks you out on a date, you say “no,” and things change in the workplace, then it might be sexual harassment.  Let’s say that after you turn him down for the date, you notice that you are being overlooked for overtime and promotions.  That’s against the law, and action should be taken.  With the same scenario, he doesn’t take no for an answer and keeps asking you out after you’ve clearly and decisively turned him down.  That’s sexual harassment.  It’s a “hostile work environment” when you are constantly plied with requests for dates!  What must be established is that there is a “pattern” of treatment that creates a “hostile work environment.”

Let’s say this boss that asks you out is your manager at a large company.  If isn’t taking no for an answer, the next step is to report the situation to upper management or to the Human Resources Department.  This complaint should be in writing.  Upper management is responsible for making sure that there is not a hostile work environment for employees.  They should reach out to your boss about the complaint and make sure it never happens again.  If, after you’ve made the complaint, the behavior continues, there is an actionable claim against the business.

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By |2018-07-02T13:07:10+00:00July 2nd, 2018|0 Comments

About the Author:

Senior Partner Ms. Wittenstein began working at the firm in 1985 as a managing paralegal, learning all the practices and procedures of the firm from Mr. Wittenstein and the staff. From 1995-1998, she attended CUNY Law School where she made a mark as a teaching assistant for Civil Rights leader Haywood Burns. She founded a Human Rights Delegation to Haiti and studied Constitutional Law with Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Working at the Equal Opportunity Employment Commision (EEOC), she learned a great deal about Employment Discrimination matters. She brought her knowledge of the Personal Injury practice and her passion for Civil Rights to the firm when she was admitted to the Bar in 1999. In 2000, she became a partner and the firm name was changed to Wittenstein & Wittenstein, Esqs. PC.

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